Sunday, February 10, 2013

U.S. State Birds Flowers, Trees & Capitals

Do You Know What Your State Flower or Bird Is?
Well You Should!
 
 
Once upon a time state flowers were found along hillsides, highways and home gardens. The Golden Poppy is California State flower and yet, I don't see them along hillsides, highways or in anyone's gardens! What ever happen to the glory of seeing all of the beautiful flowers.. and where have they gone?
 
I rarely see a California Golden Poppy alongside the road or in the distance. It was a grand site to see a hillside with a blanket of orange poppies! The brilliant color was hard to miss. Every now and again I'll see a couple poppies in a cluster and remember the days of rolling hills of orange.
 
Other people are saying the same thing about not finding their state flowers in the wild, alongside roads or even at nurseries. It's time for all of us to take back our flowers and say.. I miss  you, I want you, I need you and I will represent!
 
I challenge all backyard gardeners and state capitals to plant at least one state plant. If you're from New York, your state flower is a beautiful rose. If you're from Florida, your state flower is a wonderful orange blossom. If you're from the Illinois, your state flower is a lovely native violet.
 
As backyard gardeners, we should be the first to notice our state flowers missing from the common landscapes of America. Gardening is often a domino effect. Perhaps if you plant your state flower in in your front yard, maybe your neighbor will or maybe you'll inspire someone in the community to do the same. How about buying a pack of flowers and offer your neighbor one?
 
 
California Golden Poppy
 
 
So many things from childhood or landscapes are missing or are being lost because, we as people are either neglecting or simply forgetting about things. The social media/internet/computer age has unfortunately made all of us couch potatoes or computer chair loungers.
 
We all use to have at least one ol' backyard gardener on the block who had the best lawn, the best flower beds or the best curb appeal. As kids we would think, 'Man .. that guy needs to get a life.' 
 
Well guess what? That 'guy' did have a life. He was creating beauty, history, memories for himself, his family and for passer-bye's. It's time to slow down, give up the computer, cellphones and T.V. for a day and get out and be that guy who takes pride in his manicured lawn and beautiful flower beds.
 
I rarely see anyone with flower beds anymore.. I hope to change that by planting flower beds in my front yard and one of them will include the California state flower, the Golden Poppy.




Reseeding Your State or County With Wildflowers!
Did you know that some states actually reseed wildflower seeds each year via hydro-seeding but, most states don't.

You can actually adopt a highway to help pick-up litter.. how about reseeding your native flower? Here's a link to contact your governor to request that your state reseed your native flower. Tell them how much you miss seeing that special flower and how states like Illinois actually reseed country sides using hydro-seeding method.
 
 
 
Where to Buy state wildflower seeds
 
 
 
Arkansas State Flower
Apple Blossom (Pyrus Coronaria)
 
STATE 
 STATE TREE 
 STATE FLOWER 
 STATE BIRD 
 
Alabama
Montgomery
Southern Pine
Picea sitchensis
Camellia
Camellia sp.
Yellow Hammer
 
Alaska
Juneau
Sitka Spruce
Pinus palustris
Forget-me-not
Myosotis scorpioides
Willow Ptarmigan
 
Arizona
Phoenix
Paloverde
Cercidium floridum
Saguaro cactus
Carnegiea gigantea
Cactus Wren
 
Arkansas
Little Rock
Pine
Pinus echinata
Apple blossom
Mockingbird
 
California
Sacramento
California Redwood
Sequoia sempervirens
Golden poppy
Eschscholzia californica
California Valley Quail
 
Colorado
Denver
Blue Spruce
Picea pungens
Rocky Mountain Columbine
Aquilegia caerulea
Lark Bunting
 
Connecticut
Hartford
White Oak
Quercus alba
Mountain laurel
Kalmia latifolia
Robin
 
Delaware
Dover
American Holly
Ilex opaca
Peach blossom
Blue Hen Chicken
 
Florida
Tallahassee
Cabbage Palmetto
Sabal palmetto
Orange blossom
Mockingbird
 
Georgia
Atlanta
Live Oak
Quercus virginiana
Cherokee rose
Rosa laevigata
Brown Thrasher
 
Massachusetts
Boston
American Elm
Ulmus americana
Mayflower
Epigaea repens
Chickadee
 
Michigan
Lansing
Eastern White Pine
Pinus strobus
Apple blossom
Pyrus coronaria
Robin
 
Minnesota
St. Paul
Red Pine
Pinus resinosa
Lady slipper
Cypripedium reginae
Common Loon
 
Mississippi
Jackson
Southern Magnolia
Magnoila grandiflora
Magnolia
Magnolia grandiflora
Mockingbird
 
Missouri
Jefferson City
Flowering Dogwood
Cornus florida
Hawthorn
Crataegus sp.
Bluebird
 
Montana
Helena
Ponderosa Pine
Pinus ponderosa
Bitterroot
Lewisia rediviva
Western Meadowlark
 
Nebraska
Lincoln
Cottonwood
Populus deltoides
Goldenrod
Soldiago gigantea
Western Meadowlark
 
Nevada
Carson City
Bristlecone Pine
Pinus aristata
Sagebrush
Artemisia arbuscula
Mountain Bluebird
 
New Hampshire
Concord
Paper Birch
Betula papyrifera
Purple lilac
Syringa vulgaris
Purple Finch
 
New Jersey
Trenton
Northern Red Oak
Quercus rubra
Purple violet
Viola sororia
Eastern Goldfinch
 
New Mexico
Santa Fe
Pinyon
Pinus edulis
Yucca
Yucca sp.
Roadrunner
 
New York
Albany
Sugar Maple
Acer saccharum
Rose
Rosa sp.
Bluebird
 
North Carolina
Raleigh
Pine
Pinus palustris
Dogwood
Cornus florida
Cardinal
 
North Dakota
Bismarck
American Elm
Ulmus americana
Wild prairie rose
Rosa carolina
Western Meadowlark
 
Ohio
Columbus
Ohio Buckeye
Aesculus glabra
Scarlet carnation
Dianthus caryophyllus
Cardinal
 
Oklahoma
Oklahoma City
Eastern Redbud
Cercis canadensis
Mistletoe
Loranthaceae sp.
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
 
Oregon
Salem
Douglas fir
Pseudotsuga meziesii
 
Oregon Grape
Mahonia aquifolium
Western Meadowlark
 
Pennsylvania
Harrisburg
Eastern Hemlock
Tsuga canadensis
Mountain laurel
Kalmia latifolia
Ruffed Grouse
 
Rhode Island
Providence
Red Maple
Acer rubrum
Violet
Viola sp.
Rhode Island Red
 
South Carolina
Columbia
Cabbage Palmetto
Sabal palmetto
Yellow jessamine
Gelsemium sempervirens
Great Carolina Wren
 
South Dakota
Pierre
White Spruce
Picea flauca
Pasque flower
Anemone pulsatilla
Ring-necked Pheasant
 
Tennessee
Nashville
Yellow Poplar
Liriodendron tulipifera
Purple iris
Iridaceae sp.
Mockingbird
 
Texas
Austin
Pecan
Carya illinoensis
Texas Blue Bonnet
Lupinus texensis
Mockingbird
 
Utah
Salt Lake City
Blue Spruce
Picea pungens
Sego lily
Calochortus gunnisonii
American Seagull
 
Vermont
Montpelier
Sugar Maple
Acer saccarum
Red clover
Trifolium pratense
Hermit Thrush
 
Virginia
Richmond
Flowering Dogwood
Cornus florida
Dogwood
Cornus florida
Cardinal
 
Washington
Olympia
Western Hemlock
Tsuga heterophylla
Western rhododendron
Rhododendron macrophyllum
Willow Goldfinch
 
West Virginia
Charleston
Sugar Maple
Acer saccarum
Rhododendron
Rhododendron sp.
Cardinal
 
Wisconsin
Madison
Sugar Maple
Acer saccarum
Wood violet
Viola sororia
Robin
 
Wyoming
Cheyenne
Cottonwood
Populus Sargentii
Indian paint brush
Castilleja affinis
 
Western Meadow Lark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SouthWestGardenGuide.BlogSpot.com



U.S. First Lady
Lady Bird Johnson
 
*Lady Birdy Johnson always lead by example. She was the top doll of U.S. First Ladies. She left a legacy to America by setting up an organization called Lady Bird Johnson's Wildflower Center located at University of Texas at Austin. There's lots of resources on her website and her organization offers grants to schools and communities to ensure education regarding conservation for future educations.
 
Backyard gardeners can purchase wildflowers seeds directly from Lady Bird Johnson's organization as well.
 

LADY BIRD'S LEGACY

Sowing the Future, One Seed at a Time
The Austin American-Statesman, in partnership with the Wildflower Center, has begun a five-year campaign to honor Lady Bird Johnson by bringing color to the hills and highways of Central Texas. The campaign, which will raise money to plant wildflower seeds, will conclude in 2012, the year when Lady Bird would have turned 100.

In support of this campaign, a special mix of Central Texas wildflower seeds has been created by the Wildflower Center in collaboration with Native American Seed. A share of the proceeds from the sale of Lady Bird's Legacy Mix goes to fund the Wildflower Center's Seed Grant Program.
 

4 comments:

  1. Thanks for the fantastic post! I loved the graph/chart you put together for the birds and trees, very creative.

    -Samudaworth Tree Service
    Tree Pruning Brooklyn

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Ken Nicely for your correspondence. I'm new at blogging and to tell you the truth.. I'm still trying to figure out all of the settings. Your comment is most encouraging.If you know how long it took me to list the State bird/flower/tree chart.

      Last year I noticed that I'm seeing less and less California Golden Poppies growing alongside hillsides and roads. I had wrote California governor Jerry Brown asking if he has a re-seeding program like some other states have. We don't here in California. So, my local garden club are all trying to bring back local wildflowers across America via out blogs. I hope it works.

      A gal in Minnesota told me that her state flower, 'Lady's Slipper' a type of orchid is on an endangered list within the Midwest particular in Iowa. Sad isn't it?

      *I bet you were busy after Hurricane Sandy with tree pruning. It's interesting to see the sort of 'patio' trees grow in cities as like New York. I once saw a banana tree growing in a container (with banana's) on a balcony in lower Manhattan. How cool is that?

      Someone once said that we find peace living next to a pine tree that drops noisy pine cones all night long, harbors squirrels and forever chirpy birds and always scattering pine needles about but, put us next to a noisy neighbor we have issues with him. Ahh trees (sigh).

      Delete
  2. Hi Emma,

    Love your post about the birds and flowers and Lady Bird. I was a child when LBJ was President and Lady Bird was First Lady. Found your site whilst searching state birds and flowers. Can't figure out quite how to follow your blog...where is the link?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Howdy Reecea,

    Thank you very much for your correspondence. I've been a fan of Lady Bird Johnson and President Johnson for years. As a kid I used to enjoy studying US Presidents but, as a girl, I was more intrigued with their wife's.

    I was born in '67 Ireland our school curriculum covered American history because, of the Irish influence in America. After learning about a new president, I'd try to find out as much as I could on American First Ladies but, there was rarely any information other than Jackie Onasis or Mary Todd Lincoln.

    Lady Bird was a fascinating gal. She was strong, compassionate, could be an absolute rattlesnake when needed and she was always a lady. With all that said, she was a true Texan and all American. American women have a strong will and determination when motivated that's different than other women around the world. They truly can move mountains or persuade foreign policies even if they're the First Lady of USA. Wink. :O)

    If you enjoy Lady Bird Johnson, you'll enjoy her recipes. Food can tell a lot about a person. A personal recipe can determine if you're an anal retentive person or just easy going.

    Stop by LBJ's President Library website and you'll see some really easy and good recipes that Lady Bird made on a regular basis.

    http://www.lbjlib.utexas.edu/johnson/archives.hom/FAQs/Recipes/recipes.asp

    There's a cheese wafer that she's been making since the 60's that's made out of cheddar cheese, rice crispies and cayenne pepper. I use them to dip salsa.

    I see what you mean about not having a link to sign up for my blog. There seems to be a glitch of sorts. I've placed a small link at the far bottom of the page that says, "subscribe to posts'. Then you would click the word 'Posts'.

    I'll see about posting Lady Bird Johnson's recipes that I often use. Her recipes are as colorful as she was.

    ReplyDelete

Howdy!

Thank you very much for your comments and questions. I'll be sure to reply as soon as I can. With Regards ~Emma