Monday, October 7, 2013

Easy Companion Planting




Vegetable and Flower Garden
Companion Planting Made Simple

Companion planting is when you plant different vegetables or flowers together or in close proximity with the goal of controlling or ridding bad pests (deer, rabbits) and weeds, improving nutrient uptake and fertility, attracting bees, butterflies and other good insects that will improving pollination or rid your plants of damaging insects.

Besides using companion planting to rid pests or attract bees for pollination, companion planting can actually improve your soil or heighten the flavor and aroma of foods because, a companion plant is warding off disease, damaging elements and allow nutrients to easily absorb into a plants root, stem or leaf system.

Companion planting absolutely works because one or more of the following occurs:


One plant will produce a particular substance or substances that help another plant in various ways. Basil will repel aphids from tomato plants.

Growing habits of one plant compliment the growing habits of another which will help the plant thrive to its potential.

 
One plant will attract insect predators that eat the insect pests on the companion. If you had planted 10 cabbages all together you would almost certainly lose several to moths or caterpillars unless you carried out regular spraying of insecticides which I feel isn't good for your health; however,  if you plant them with celery and beets and some peas, you would have a successful cabbage crop. Caterpillars can't stand the smell of celery.
 

One plant will repel the pests that eat or damage its companion. For instance, pepper plants near cabbage will repel cabbage moths.

One plant disguises its companion so that pests do not recognize it.
 



One plant creates a micro-climate for another.


One plant attracts pollinators that are required by its companion. Colorful flowers like marigold or cosmos can attract bees, butterflies and moths that help pollinate the flowers of a pepper or tomato plant.

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Companion Planting


VegetableLikesDislikes
Asparagustomatoes, parsley, basil
Beanspotatoes, carrots, cucumbers, cauliflower, cabbage, summer savory, most other vegetables and herbsonions, garlic, gladiolus
Pole Beanscorn, summer savoryonions, beets, kohlrabi
Bush Beanspotatoes, cucumbers, strawberries, celery, summer savoryonions
Beetsonions, kohlrabipole beans
Cabbage Familyaromatic plants, potatoes, dill, celery, chamomile, sage, peppermint, rosemary, beets, onionsstrawberries, tomatoes, pole beans
Carrotspeas, leaf lettuce, chives, onions, leeks, rosemary, sage, tomatoesdill
Celeryleek, tomatoes, c cauliflower, bush beans, cabbage
Chivescarrotspeas, beans
Cornpotatoes, peas, beans, cucumbers, pumpkin, squash
Cucumbersbeans, corn, peas, radishes, sunflowerskohlrabi, potato, fennel, cabbage
Eggplantbeans
Leekonions, celery, carrots
Lettucecarrots, radishes, strawberry, cucumber
(carrots, lettuce and radish make a strong team)
Onion
(also Garlic)
beets, strawberry, tomato, lettuce, summer savory,
chamomile (sparsely)
peas, beans
Parsleytomato, asparagus
Peascarrots, turnips, radishes, cucumbers, corn, beans, most vegetables and herbsonions, garlic, gladiolus, potato
Potatobeans, corn, cabbage, horseradish (should be planted at the corner of the patch), marigold, eggplant (as a lure for Colorado Potato beetle)pumpkin, squash, cucumber, sunflower, tomato, raspberry
Pumpkincornpotato
Radishpeas, nasturtium, lettuce, cucumber
Soybeansgrows with anything, helps everything
Spinachstrawberries
Squashnasturtium, corn
Strawberriesbush bean, spinach, borage, lettuce (as a border)cabbage
Sunflowercucumberspotato
Tomatochives, onions, parsley, asparagus, marigold, nasturtium, carrots
Turnippeas

   Melons              Nasturtium, corn, tomato

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Howdy!

Thank you very much for your comments and questions. I'll be sure to reply as soon as I can. With Regards ~Emma